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Artificial condition book cover
Artificial condition book cover

Artificial condition

Martha Wells

SCIENCE FICTION Wells Martha
Science Fiction

It has a dark past - one in which a number of humans were killed. A past that caused it to christen itself Murderbot. But it has only vague memories of the massacre that spawned that title, and it wants to know more. Teaming up with a research transport vessal named ART (you don't want to know what the A stands for), Murderbot heads to the mining facility where it went rogue. What it discovers will forever change the way it thinks ...

This series continues to entertain! It's an easy recommendation for fans of Sci-Fi. -Brian

The sun does shine : how I found life and freedom on death row book cover
The sun does shine : how I found life and freedom on death row book cover

The sun does shine : how I found life and freedom on death row

Anthony Ray Hinton

364.66 /Hinton
Memoir

"A powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent thirty years on death row for a crime he didn't commit"--

I recently read Bryan Stevenson's book, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, and had The Sun Does Shine on my TBR list not knowing it was written by one of the innocent people Stevenson and his Equal Justice Initiative fought to free.

Hinton was wrongly convicted of a crime he did not commit and was sentenced to death. The evidence proving his innocence was overwhelming, but a racist system paid no attention and an innocent man spent years waiting for death.

Hinton's inner strength is incredible. He has every right to be angry, to be bitter. He has every right to hate the people who did this to him. And yet he remained hopeful, never giving in despite a system that looks at color before facts. To read his story in his own words is so amazingly heart-breaking and frustrating, and so incredibly difficult at times. I wanted to stop, but I couldn't. Closing our eyes to reality doesn't make the injustice go away. There are more people like Hinton than we want to believe and they deserve the fairness we've been told our justice system is built upon. Unfortunately, reality paints a different picture. -Meredith

The only street in Paris : life on the Rue des Martyrs book cover
The only street in Paris : life on the Rue des Martyrs book cover

The only street in Paris : life on the Rue des Martyrs

Elaine Sciolino

944.361 /Sciolino
Nonfiction, Memoir

Rue des Martyrs is more than just a street, it's an enchanting and bustling community in Paris. At just over half a mile long, spanning between the Ninth and 18th arrondissements, this street is filled with four- and five-story buildings of varying architectural designs, with picturesque wrought-iron balconies and shuttered windows and small businesses at street level. As the author (La Seduction), a former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, explores her neighborhood, she describes its fascinating history, from ancient churches and the saints and martyrs the street may be named after to the 19th-century Cirque Medrano. The quaint cafés and shops remain locally owned, per Paris law, and their merchants and artisans are the leading characters of the book--and of the street. There's Roger Henri, who pushes a cart with a bell offering his knife-sharpening services; Michou, the owner and creator of the transvestite cabaret at No. 80; and Laurence Gillery, the woman who restores antique barometers, the last of her kind. The atmosphere on rue des Martyrs is refreshing and enticing in our modern world.

Elaine Sciolino's book is a lovely paean to the Rue des Martrys, a street that runs north-south through the 9th arrondisement of Paris, and into the village of Montmartre. She chronicles the lives and activities of the storefronts and shopkeepers who live and work there, as well as the life and changing nature of the street itself. The assortment of shops--many of them providing fresh foods and personal services--help to create a sense of community among the residents that seems uniquely Parisian, and possibly of a bygone era. -Candice

The day the world came to town : 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland book cover
The day the world came to town : 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland book cover

The day the world came to town : 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland

Jim DeFede

971.804 /DeFede
History

After thirty-eight jetliners were rerouted to Newfoundland on September 11, 2001 because the United States' airspace was closing, the townspeople of Gander came to the aid of six thousand travelers, offering food, lodging, and other comforts.

I checked this out because I noticed that our patrons kept putting holds on it, despite it being an older title (published in 2002). And now I understand why it's been so popular. If you lived through the events of September 11, 2001, this story provides another perspective on that horrific day. The residents of Gander, Newfoundland embraced (figuratively and sometimes literally) the more than 6,000 air passengers that were diverted to their small town when the United States closed its airspace. The book follows the stories of several of the passengers, one of the airline pilots, and several Gander citizens who helped. You will learn a little bit about air traffic control, the pets who were on those planes, and how many small acts of kindness can have a tremendous impact. -Heidi L

The legend of Zelda. Breath of the wild. book cover
The legend of Zelda. Breath of the wild. book cover

The legend of Zelda. Breath of the wild.

VIDEO GAME Switch Legend

Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule In this stunning Open-Air Adventure.

I haven't owned a video game console since the original Nintendo, seeing clips of Breath of the Wild online made me think it was time to explore the Nintendo Switch. It didn't take long to understand how to manipulate the controller (so many more buttons!) and the game does a great job introducing you to game mechanics and trains you as you play. It's fun to battle monsters but just as enjoyable is wandering around the fantasy landscape climbing trees, foraging mushrooms, and picking up rocks to see what's underneath. -Jason

Imagine! book cover
Imagine! book cover

Imagine!

Raúl Colón

jE Colon
Picture Books, Art / Art History, Fantasy

"When a boy visits an art museum and one of the paintings comes to life, he has an afternoon of adventure and discovery [that] changes how he sees the world ever after"--

Colón’s wordless narrative highlights imaginative play utilizing and in response to art, showcasing the way art can affect our creative processes. -Casey

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